Marketing
Now we understand that the most important thing we do is market the product. We've come around to saying that Nike is a marketing-oriented company, and the product is our most important marketing tool. ~ Phil Knight, CEO Nike

You might think of marketing this way. If business is all about people and money and the art of persuading one to part from the other, then marketing is all about finding the right people to persuade.

Marketing is your strategy for allocating resources (time and money) in order to achieve your objectives (a fair profit for supplying a good product or service).

Yet the most brilliant strategy won’t help you earn a profit or achieve your wildest dreams if it isn’t built around your potential customers. A strategy that isn’t based on customers is rather like a man who knows a thousand ways to chop wood, but doesn’t have any wood to chop. Great in theory but unrewarding in practice.

If you fit the classic definition of an entrepreneur (someone with a great idea who’s under-capitalized), you may think marketing is something you do later — after the product is developed, manufactured, or ready to sell.

Though it may feel counter-intuitive, marketing doesn’t begin with a great idea or a unique product. It begins with customers — those people who want or need your product and will actually buy it.

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